News

Black Lives Matter to the Harriett Buhai Center for Family Law

With sadness, but also with determination and resolve, the Harriett Buhai Center for Family Law joins Americans of conscience in reiterating that Black Lives Matter. The recent events in Minneapolis and elsewhere are the antithesis of the Center’s core purpose, which is to advance equal justice, fairness, dignity, and respect. But while the national focus is
[Read more]

In Memoriam: Sorrell Trope

In recognition of the esteem in which he is held, the Harriett Buhai Center for Family Law and Harris Ginsberg LLP honored Sorrell Trope in the Daily Journal this week. Click here to view the tribute. About Sorrell TropeMore than any other family law practitioner, Sorrell Trope was instrumental in raising the practice of family law to
[Read more]

Volunteering During the Public Health Crisis

We welcome the involvement of law students, law graduates and lawyers offering their assistance to help low-income litigants in family court with custody, domestic violence and other problems based on their range of practice, litigation know-how, linguistic capabilities and available Center resources for training and mentorship. Interested persons should contact the Center at volunteer@hbcfl.org Updated
[Read more]

Service Changes in Response to Coronavirus/Cambios en el servicio en respuesta al coronavirus

Service Changes in Response to Coronavirus The Harriett Buhai Center for Family Law is operational on a remote basis. Low–income individuals seeking  domestic violence and family law assistance can call the Harriett Buhai Center for Family Law at 213-388-7515 and leave a message with a safe contact phone number. Legal assessment, advice and ongoing services will continue
[Read more]

Volunteer Award Recipients for 2019

Benjamin Kanani: Hall of Fame Award The Hall of Fame Award honors a volunteer whose efforts exhibit, by action and deed over an extended period of time, exceptional service and dedication to the Center, its clients and its causes, and who has left a permanent mark in its history. Christopher W. Moore: Frances Wender Kandel
[Read more]